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by board members. any appointments this evening? seeing none. i am pleased to introduce our elections commission report. delivered by our election commission appointee, catalina ruiz-healy. you can sit here. if you would like. >> good evening. superintendent, and new president and vice president and commissioners. thanks for having me. i was honored to receive your appointment in march, 2011, to be your appointee to the commission for the san francisco election department. you have received a memo from me. and i can go over it quickly, and i hope you had a chance to read it. but basically the city charter authorizes the election commission to supervisor the elections. and we are charged with a fairly narrow scope of work, for generally setting the department of elections and for the proper administration of the department. so the budget and we hire and fire the department of elections. so take a breath here. the way that the commission works on their on and off years. in 2011 our work focused on operations and less on policy. because we are getting ready to implement elections in the
bhfer you take votes right away from certain conconstituentcy to none elected officials it problematic and secondly it can be open to litigation and the purpose of this is to protect focus it will counties and the taxpayers in san francisco and this does not have any profession to the rate pairs or taxpayers of san francisco for any litigation that may come about as as a result of this amendment and i urge you to consider that before you pass this amendment and lastly, it doesn't involve all of the key stakeholders in this conversation. the city of california, has determined that the economic value of restoring hetch hetchy would be $6 billion annually to the people of california and therefore, i think that is 6 billion reasons why they are key stakeholders in this process and so, we would urge you would amend or revise or have more conversation truly about this issue by requiring that instead of providing veto power to unelect of the power on the peninsula require an elect toarl component to the region it may represent and put it directly to the voters of the from a and if you are go
the time. >> give me one example. [laughter] >> i said on national television the night -- election night of 2000 as florida was coming in that the election would be decided that night. people may remember that election was decided by the supreme court. it went on for two or three months. it ended up being decided by the governors, bush's brother, a supreme court judge chosen by his father. >>> george bush was asked if he had ever been wrong and said he could not think of a time. he is still saying that. [laughter] humble man. we are about out of time. do you have a short question? >> what is the circulation of "the nation"? >> 1.5 million readers online and 160,000 paper circulation. paul newman was a great and loyal friend and supporter. his partner in crime, robert redford, has been a supporter. we have a circle of 100 people who give each year. 30,000 associates give little each month above the subscription price in the belief it is not just a media institution but a community. there are 40 discussion groups around the country. [applause] >> these people obviously support it for what
, and fighting in elections to change the supreme court. >> what would you think of having a national general assembly modeled on the original continental congress in philadelphia beginning on july 4 of 2012? coming up with a list of grievances that this assembly debated. >> lawrence blessing has talked about a new constitutional convention. i think it is early. i think it is tricky. i do not mean to sound too conservative. when you say to make a list of grievances, we could sit in this room and come up with a list of six ideas or grievances that need to be made real and lead to change. you need to find your issue, work in your community. work in the organizing around the issue. link up with groups doing work. if it is student debt, find ways to take on the banks, local legislators, and congress in the short term. is not very revolutionary. at the event we did on 9/11, i said i felt this country was in a pre-revolutionary moment. it was about a week before occupy was street launched. i believe in evolution, not revolution. >> katrina, did you read the foreign affairs article that backs up the
. >> seven ayes. >> now we proceed to the annual election of officers for the board of education. as a reminder to the board and public, this election is by voice vote. and we do not need a second, and it's permisable for a member to vote for themselves. good to know. board members you will vote by name. if only one nomination, or more than you vote by aye or nay. i declare that the floor is open for the nomination of president for board 2013. >> i would like to nominate our current vice president, rachel norton. >> any further? if no more, i declare the nomination closed. >> commissioner norton, i would like to move that we elect commissioner norton by acclimation. that needs a second. >> second. >> any other discussion? okay, we are good. thank you very much. [applause] i have the pleasure to announce that i have been elected president of the board. [laughter] i am now declaring nominations open for the office of vice president of the board of education for the year of 2013. any nominations? commissioner mendoza. >> it would be my honor to nominate sandra fewer. >> i think we w
represented for our community in terms of a step forward. we are now elected lgbt peep to office and harvey was such an incredible trail blazer, not? in just getting elected, but in being a great leader and always holding his head high for our community. and i know when i was first sworn into office, one of the things that i always kept in mind was something that i understand harvey to have said, * that when you go into city hall, you walk up the central staircase. you don't walk on one of the side staircases because for our community, it is so important for us to walk up that central staircase and for us to be in the middle of everything and for everyone to know that we are here. and all these years later, we've made a lot of strides in the lgbt community, but we still have so much work to do around hiv issues, around our youth, around discrimination, around transinclusion, and all the things that we know that harvey had he been here today would still be working on and leading on. and, so, we have to keep doing our work. and frankly, we can't take for granted that queer people are going t
's say, the campaign manager for a judge -- because we have elections -- if anybody's interested -- let me just finish that. if you are a campaign manager, he cannot appear before that judge. the aba spent two years on a report called justice in jeopardy, which is online, and it talks about how judges are elected in every single state. one of the document you might be interested in because i understand you have had vigorous talks about this recently is immigration. the aba just issued several months ago the most comprehensive immigration reform report in the last two decades. it contains 10,000 pro bono lawyer hours of some of the best law firms in america. part of the frustration that exists regarding immigration -- and i was just at a white house meeting monday and tuesday of this week on this issue -- it relates to the anchor -- the anger people have saying that is broken and we cannot fix it and there's nothing we can do. that is wrong. we have an ability to fix the problem. we should fix the problem. the aba rendered a report that it will continue to act as a resource in fixing the
of elected throughout the state and community leaders as well and we are hopeful that this will be a template for what wedo in this case and that we get a similar level of success to make sure had a money goes back to the people who are victim iressed and that they get the restitution that they deserve and i would like to introduce michael papist from the enter face-to-face 98 counsel because he was a big part in making sure we got our effort out to the 98 community and to make sure that borrowers who were vimsed got the restitution they deserved and we are happy he is cooperating in our effort for the next 90 days. >> p oop pennsylvania a s.-the san francisco enter fate counsel is absolutely indebted if you will forgive the pun to his city treasure her heira in this suspicious when this program started. we believe that the victims of predatory lending are sill the in in our pews and we work with faith-based organization to provide the safety yet and net and we are here today to commit ourselves again to the good work that dennis is doing and in the past, we have used our technology networ
elections, that is a luxury. people participate in the democratic process. that is something that is quite amazing and remarkable. i think that you do not fully appreciate it if you have had it all your life. whereas someone who came from a place where that was not possible, i think that i have a unique appreciation for it. it was really an exciting thing to do. >> where would you place yourself now on the political spectrum? the left, the right? supervisor campos: i think the labels can mean a lot of different things. i see myself as someone who ultimately has tried to make things better for people. i have a progressive outlook in terms of how i see things. by progressive i mean the sense that we have to make government and the city work for everyone, and that means that not just those who are doing well. it is also those who are not doing so well. it also means making sure the city works for the middle class and to think of innovative ways of addressing issues and to not be afraid to think outside the box. that is what i see as being "progressive," in that sense. ultimately, there is a g
pleasure to introduce the president elect of the bar association of san francisco. they provide conflict attorneys to handle cases when a defender is not available. >> i am the president elect of the bar association. we're very proud to co-sponsor the justice of it. on behalf of the 8000 members, and all of those who -- dedicate their careers -- we are very fortunate to have his leadership with top-notch legal representation. for those who were charged each year who are innocent. an important part of the mission is providing equal access to justice. this is shared by his office and all the public defenders. we're proud of the conflict panel that he described, and we also provide the top-notch representation in matters that his office cannot handle. we applaud you for what you do and for those of you who could not make it, thank you very much. this year's public defender simon will be an interesting day, full of cutting edge issues. gang violence and brain science and crime, these are issues at the forefront and deserve all of our attention. this is a greatat>> your going p with me becaus
in the book about this a little. if senator kennedy had been alive, he was so critical to the election of president obama. his endorsement in the pivotal period with the turbulence in turmoil early after south carolina, i think he would have been important inside the system as a push towards something bigger and would have pushed to have more connection to outside the beltway. obama it is now traveling on the country. he is forced to because of the election. if you sit inside the beltway too long and get in the backroom deals -- >> even movements can be cloistered. i remember a dinner during the george w. bush administration in southern california. it was norman lear and his wife, larry david, bob scheer. they were sitting around w eeping in their expensive soup about the fact that we were living in hell. rupert murdoch on the media. george bush was president. norman lear had his pulse on american culture for 30 years. why cannot figure out how to deal -- deliver a message that is important and happening? >> that is important. we can find messages that speak to people where they are. t
and to be part of the discussion. we've got federal, state and local policy makers, elected officials, educators, law enforcement officials and leaders from the private and public sector, all of whom have traveled here from washington, dc from sacramento and all over the bay area. so thank you for being here today. we are grateful for an opportunity to come together with you to create schools and communities where young people are healthy and safe and feel welcome and they are allowed to learn and they are allowed to thrive. this day is devoted to help all of us deepen our understanding of this issue of the problem through data, through research, through anecdotes, to put real solutions in place, to comply with new state and draw laws on bullying and to measure our progress. it's a promise we want to join you in keeping to our children and our youth in california. some of you know that we started this summit yesterday with a screening of the documentary film, bully, to 3,000 students in san francisco from san francisco's public schools. the superintendent of schools you're going to hear from
hello, tom. it is exciting times in tripoli. with election and new congress coming together. as i read libya's recent history it is a bit like we are reliving the post world war ii years. how right he was. that was chris. always thinking, always sharp, always ready. public service is too often looked down upon by some in this country. often my colleagues in the foreign service la meant they don't make them the way they used to anymore. today we remember a man, chris stevens, whose life and service just proves how wrong my colleagues really are. chris shows us they still make them the way they used to, only an awful lot better, thank you. [applause] >> chris's family would like to invite everyone to a reception after the ceremony. it will be held over there. you are all welcome. let us pray. oh lord, support us all the day long until the shadows lengthen and the evening comes and the busy world is hushed and the fever of life is over and our work is done. then in your mercy grant us a safe lodging and a holy rest and peace at the last. may the author of all life bless us and keep us. in
elections, which are meant to be different than legislative elections -- remember that we have two branches of government that the framers decided would be controlled by a majority vote. that is the executive and legislative. they did a pretty good job of keeping their fingers in the air, right? i think that people have a right to lobby. i think for people do not have the same access as rich people. i think for people have a lot of things that they cannot do because of the resources they have available, but i think lobbying in general, as long as it is not anything that is secretive, and that is one of the big problems in lobbying -- the secret of aspects of it -- but as long as they do not violate the law, there is going to be lobbying. i think a bigger problem and one that i'm glad i have a couple of minutes to talk about, is the political action committees coming into states and targeting judges. that is a huge problem. look at what happened in iowa. you had a supreme -- you know about the judges that got removed? we do not know about that? ok, let me talk about that for a second year of
heads and elected officials. i know i've seen some of you here. thank you for coming out to support the fund workover our city employees. it is a privilege to me in particular to be here because i have had the opportunity for the last several years to be on the selection committee for the good government awards. it is really a treat. as a human-resources director, i get a lot of bad news. some of that gets in the newspaper. with all due respect to our brethren in the press, it's always a good story to write about bad behavior that may happen in a city department or that a public employee may have engaged in. we are the largest employer in san francisco. it is only natural as some of that bad behavior may fall on our doorsteps. it is refreshing to see some of the wonderful work people are doing, who really personify the ethos of san francisco. i want to celebrate that. on behalf of the mayor, thank you. please do your part to extend your appreciation to those people. it was a very difficult process. the community members who are involved in the selection process, as we know, we had g
was elected to the board of supervisors in 2008 and reelected in 2010. we will get to know her and talk about the toughest issues facing the city. welcome, supervisor. thank you for joining us. let's start by talking about your background -- where you grew up, what kinds of jobs you have work. supervisor chu: my parents immigrated to the united states about 30 years ago, and i would say that is probably the most formative part of my background. growing up in an immigrant family, you learn many things. my parents raised me in southern california, and i grew up in the restaurant business. they had a small restaurant at the time, and i was there every weekend, working -- well, not working, eating. having a fried egg roll, wanton, something good. it taught me the value of working hard and what it meant to be part of a small business, a small business -- a small business, small family, and an immigrant family at that. really being impacted by the los angeles riots, when that occurred, put me on the path toward public policy and understanding what it meant to have opportunities and not have opportu
was appointed in 2009 and elected in 2010 and has an amazing background dealing dealing with violence against women and domestic violence, elder abuse, child abuse and threat management. she's a wonderful addition to our panel so thank you nancy. [applause] next to nancy is tony smith who i loved his biobest of all and started he's an oakland resident and parent of students in oakland public schools. he was -- became the superintendent in 2009. he's a local boy including university of california berkeley background where he was captain of the football team and he did not include this in the biobut i know it and he wrote his under graduate thesis on emily dickon son so he's kind of a renaissance dude and he's 6-foot something. next to him is -- [applause] and next to him is george gaston and elect to the district attorney of the city and county of san francisco in 2011 after winning more than 62% of the vote which in san francisco is very enviable and focused on reducing violent crime, protecting vulnerable victims and respecting with high school truancy and rel haven't to the conversation
to know my italian friends introduce me as david chiu o. 20 years ago like every elected that didn't grow up in san francisco and i know we are all from different areas i came here 20 years ago from the east coast and in part i was fascinated by chinatown and it's next to the old italian neighborhood of north beach and in the great cities like boston et cetera and when i walked around that neighborhood it was the neighborhood that drew me to the great city whether being reminded of great baseball players, the joe migage i don't play ground. >> >> or the fisherman or the piazza that i look forward to work with angela to lobby the mayor to adequately fund it. there are special quarters that come from the community that are represented tonight and i am happy to come and raise a glass to all of you and look forward to cel celebrating the italian. >> american history. thank you. >> good evening. i am verna patty. i am coming from congresswoman pelosi's office. she is celebrating in washington dc the italian culture with the minister. "dr. friends greetings as you. >> >> gather in san fran
and high. go back to 2008. the back to the election and year when we are fortunate region were fortunate enough to be living with debates that were not cruel reality shows. every week, there were debates among the democratic candidates. barack obama embodied change. it seemed he brought into politics a generation of young people and minorities who never thought of the electoral system as a vehicle for change. so many people saw in him the possibility of change that would come quickly. my sense is that it is so corroded that we need to take back a government that has been rigged against working people, ordinary people, the poor. we need to understand it will take more than one election cycle to bring about fundamental change in this country. it will take wind at the back of the president and political system to bring about change. president obama -- this is not a political time when roosevelt lived in. the labor movements are not as strong. today there was a story about the tea party move -- losing its mojo. we're seeing overreach that has led people to this tipping point moment where mil
your presence into here city hall. i know the broadcasting world is happy from the election results last night and we can continue to deliver programming for our communities. [applause] and i know we were inspired by the president's words last night when we talked about the importance of diversity and here in san we are no stranger to that language when we celebrate all the different communities we have here in san francisco and the filipino and native american community here in san francisco. we continue to build upon our city's long standing history and celebrate diversity and multiculturalism as a part of our lives and here we celebrating the american indian and enriches the great history of our city. these events are special to us and gives us the opportunity to recognize the unsung heroes whose work goes unnoticed and it's an opportunity to share with the larger community and i would like to thank the native american organizing community and the health center, the health center of santa clara, our office and i would like to make a special note of one of our employees who has
in 100 years when he was elected 10 years ago and he has remained an effective and visionary leader for everyone. mayor newsom gained worldwide recognition when he granted marriage licenses to same sex couples in 2004. we all remember those moving pictures of smiling couples on the steps of city hall, some of them their children watching on. his actions in 2004 thrust this civil rights issue into the national spotlight and cemented his reputation as a fearless public officials who does what he thinks is right. under mayor newsom's energetic leadership the economy grew and the city became an economic center for biotech and clean tech. gach newsom has been a trail blaitzer on combating homelessness and protecting the government. in 2007 he was re-elected as mayor with more than 70 percent of the vote, which is unheard of. please welcome our lieutenant governor, gavin newsom. >> my role was to get tom to speak. i'm just going to jump in because i want to keep you all on time. you've got an agenda packet and i'm going to be held accountable if you don't meet it. roslyn, let's pic
of your adult life to fighting crime and trying to make communities safer as the elected district attorney of san francisco, you've committed yourself to that, and yet you've broken away from the position held by, i believe, every other elected district attorney in california to support marar district attorney in califoia to support senator leno's direction. why is that? >> i want to thank marty for being here. even though we disagree, i think it was really important to have the point of view of the 57 other elected d.a.'s in the state. i think it's important to understand in our dialogue so marty, thank you for being here. >> thank you. >> marty is someone i respect a great deal and he has been involved in public safety for a number of years and doing very momably serving the l.a. city attorney as well as his current position. actually, for me this has been a journey, it's not like a light switch went on yesterday. i have been involved in public safety for about 30 years. i have seen the war on drugs from the ground up. i have seen it as a police officer, young police officer walking, foo
of them are up for re-election, house is turning over -- about half of them are up for re-election and of course presidential election as well, and so it is very likely of course that this will be reintroduced after all of those changes take effect and hopefully we'll have garnered some support and move forward, so we'll keep sounding that drum beat but tlt be on pause until after january when the new add m*ins -- administrations get all in place, so the problem, this can be really overwhelming, especially if you have not spent a lot of time thinking about this, but i think one of the solutions is just to start with one thing at a time and pick something that resonates for you, whether it's your food or you have kids and you just want to focus on making sure that -- what they're using and taking in is safer, or if it's an area of your life with regard -- we'll talk about this somehow with the fire department or your fire stations or your fire houses or whatever, also reach out to the breast cancer funds, we love questions, we love working with people, we're here to be your resourc
. thank you so much for being here. we know how busy you with the election just a few days away so a round of applause for all of our vip and special guests. and now at this time we would also like to thank the city and county of san francisco and our community partners. we must acknowledge them. can't do it without them. bank of america, dignity health, miller coors, diamond foods, virgin america, pg&e, and sales force to help to make this civic celebration possible. we thank you. and of course we must recognize the giants broadcast partner sports bay area that brings sports to our giants fans all season long and made it possible for this to be watched all over northern california. all right. are you ready now? we can really get it started. [cheers and applause] . i said are you ready? [cheers and applause] it is my pleasure now to introduce two members of the best broadcast team in baseball. please welcome dave fleming and john miller. >> now, all along the parade route this song that echoed through the ballpark and my broadcast partner on the radio dave fleming somehow ha
try to keep an eye out for an elected officials i did see the fire chief walk in and joanne is here. thank you for being here. and now we are going to go back to our regular program because we have several people who have wishes who have spoken words they want to give to you that kind of express their take on the tree of hope. first of all, mention once before but now hear to speak to you alahandro mahe and teaches at the san francisco university and short story edit tore and award winner and here he is. >> thank you. >> you look fabulous. you remind me of my first girlfriend. only she was not as tall. but, i want to thank the mayor lee, and the mayor's office, and jeff, and world rainbow fund and all of you for the invitation to be here tonight. we are so privileged to be able to gather together in community and joy and celebration and hope while so much of the world is plunged in darkness and chaos and war and intolerance. i am honored to read a poem for you tonight. >> the last time that i tried this, i pulled out a parking ticket. i got lucky this time. in spanish, hope, is aran
, but it probably doesn't make nebraska smile. we live in a richly diverse city and our elected officials represent it and our events here represent it and the tree lighting should represent it and indeed it does, we call it the tree of hope. and every year we get messages from all over the country and all over the world that are put on origamis and put on this very unique, unusual tree. >> there are many cities that have holiday trees, but no one has the tree of hope. it was started by an organization and now i will have the chance to introduce you to that organization's founder and executive director. who failed to put this in the proper amount of type here. no little things happen. the sound is better, i think that you can hear and i just have to go slowly, they told me, it is my pleasure to introduce the executive director of the rainbow world fund. this organization creates this holiday tree now, this is the 7th year. let's hear for that, 7 years of anything is a long time [ applause ] rainbow world fund was founded 12 years ago, the concept and wanted to think locally but he wanted to act glo
business. he never had a single election not even for stink -- a student council. governor? [applause] in keeping with the discussion, he is keen on innovation and things of that nature. i know that will come out. thank you, governor. >> are we all set? i am from the "mercury news," and we're here because we live in a global cloueconomy. it has altered local economies because so many manufacturing and technology jobs are moving, whether it is a matter of costs for going where the trained work force is. we're fortunate to have to governors here to talk about how that change affects their jobs and what they're doing to jump- start their economies which compete with one another. this could be fun. let me start with our guest. governor hickenlooper. i knew that was going to happen. most of us here are pretty much aware of california's budget crisis. can you give us a quick briefing on where colorado is and what you are trying to do to turn things around? >> our budget is just as dressed as almost every state in the country. we have been working trying to control costs, get our pension fun
see the u.s. capitol building. in that building 535 elected representatives from every corner of america come together to debate the issues of the day. they are men and women from every religious, ethnic and family background. i look forward to watching libya develop equally strong institutions of government. education and healthcare are just two of the many areas where i see opportunities for close partnership between the united states and libya. i look forward to exploring those as we work together to build a free democratic prosperous libya. see you soon. >>> good afternoon, everyone. i'm an san francisco mayor ed lee. i want to welcome you from the bay area, from all over the country to san francisco's city hall. today we honor and celebrate ambassador john christopher stevens in this civic celebration of his life. i thank the stevens family for hosting this celebration here. amongst his many friends, his family, his colleagues from around the world who continue to reremember and celebrate his distinguished life and sacrifice he made for all of us. while we have lost a tru
that they elect their first prime minister. thank you united states for your support. again, we are sorry on behalf of libyan people for the loss of this great friend. thank you very much. [applause] >>> good afternoon, barbara lee. i represent the 9th district, including piedmont and berkeley, where ambassador stevens spent many of his formative years to. the family and friends of our beloved ambassador stevens, to mayor lee, senator feinstein, representative miller and spear, to the attorney general, ambassadors past and present, my friends. let me first express my sincereest condolences to ambassador stevens' family, friends and colleagues in the face of your tremendous loss. ambassador stevens and the others who lost their lives in libya worked each and every day to advance the highest ideals of this great nation. they will never be forgotten. ambassador stevens, in spite of the many challenges of seeking global peace and security, he truly believed peace is possible. representatives george miller and jackie spear both are with us today. our delegation has the pleasure of entering int
, boyfriend, arrived -- one time my partner, borden, said mickey should do a direct election. i said, why? the designer from the 1980's. he said, yes, but maybe it is could for perfume, things like that. to have an international passport. ok. but deep inside, i know that i should have loved to make one coutoure collection like that. a dream of the elegance of paris. and i remember that i propose -- it was the last new bid of coutoure that arrived. i thought to propose -- [unintelligible] why don't you take one designer like vivian westwood or others to make one season, one coutoure collection? >> you should call some up immediately and suggest the deal. >> [laughs] that is true. each one to make their own collection should not be back. a very attractive idea. >> as you do not want to talk about art, we will not say your work is art. let's be very vulgar and talk about money. [laughter] it is extraordinary what you have produced in coutoure. does that make any money? quick to be honest, what we produce in coutoure does not make money but it does include money. i must say, i am very proud o
-- and elected officials sounds like with anesthesia and his mouth, i want to let you know that i got out of a dental chair 20 minutes ago after a few hours of dentists work. but i wanted to give a few remarks of how i think we are doing. i'm very much more are optimistic about how we're doing than four years ago. i read an article from the chronicle and it said that the candidates disagreed on everything, except for the need to crack down on entertainment violence. i did not propose anything for the first six months until there were half a dozen people affected. that was followed by a terrific shooting, which was then followed by an incident in union square. i want to take a moment and thank the san francisco police department for your input. if we pass legislation to require additional security requirements and plans. we pass legislation to give the entertainment commission more tools to shut down those handful of clubs that have often given a bad name to the rest of the industry. we passed legislation to pass for the first time a party registry. and we pass legislation to ensure a mini
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 97 (some duplicates have been removed)

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